FAQs

The water in the pool is not moving. What do I do?

Poor circulation can be caused by a number of things:

  1. Dirty Filter.  If the filter is dirty, the pressure on the filter is usually high.  The pump, which pulls the water from the pool, is not able to push the water into the filter because of the restriction of flow a dirty filter causes.  The cure to this, is to backwash or clean the filter.
  2. Air Leak in the Piping.  If there is air being pulled into the system on the suction side, the pump will not be able to keep it’s “prime” and will not be able to move the water.  Most air leaks are above ground and may even be from the pump basket lid not being secured properly.  Check all connections, threaded and glued, and see if any are loose.
  3. Dirty Skimmer or Pump Basket.  If the baskets are full, no water will be able to flow through them.  Inspect and clean the skimmer and pump basket(s) regularly.  If the baskets are clean, there could also be debris in the pumps impeller which will cause the flow of water again to be restricted. Some of these can be cleaned by reaching in behind the pump basket and pulling out debris that you can feel.  Be sure the pump is off and nobody will turn the switch on while you are working.

I have a sand filter. How often should I change the sand inside the filter?

We would usually recommend every five years.  However, the answer may also be decided by the condition of the water each season.  If you have treated some dirty or algae filled water, it may be necessary to change the sand more often.

I have a DE filter. How many scoops of DE powder do I add after I backwash?

Different sizes and types of filters require different amounts of filter media for proper filtration.  You should refer to the specification tag or sticker on the filter.

What is the best type of filter system?

The answer to this is usually what has worked best for you in the past.  The most common type is the Diatamaceous Earth  or “DE” filter.  This type of filter removes the smallest particles from the water.  Sand and Cartridge filters are 2 other types.  Each filter has benefits in certain applications.

What does it mean when someone says they have a salt water pool?

Salt water pools have long been popular in Europe and have become more popular in the United States recently.  It is a pool that has a certain parts per million(ppm) of salt(minerals) and is using that as a sanitizer.  Through the conversion of minerals to free available chlorine, or electrolysis, a sanitizer is produced.  Your pool water passes through a cell causing the production of chlorine gas and sodium hydroxide.  When added to water, chlorine gas forms hypochlorous acid which is a chlorinating sanitizer.  This is what keeps your pool clear and silky smooth all season long.  If you have ever been in a salt pool, you probably realized right away what it difference it makes on the feel of your skin.

Contact Us for More Information, and we can tell you about Mineral Springs, from Bio Guard.

I have some staining on the surfaces of my pool. What causes that to happen?

Surface stains are most commonly due to chemical imbalance. The 2 chemical stains are inorganic(metals like copper, iron, manganese) or organic(algae, pink slime). There are steps you can take to determine which type of stain it is.  Start with a white sock with Lo N Slo (ph Decreaser) over the stain for 1-3 minutes.  A Vitamin C tablet could also be used.  If the stain lightens, it is inorganic or metal.
If the stain does not lighten add some chlorine to a white sock and place it on the stain for 1-3 minutes.  A chlorine stick or tablet could also be used.  If the stain lightens, it is organic.  You can contact us for instructions on which chemical to use to treat your stain.

I’ve added large doses of shock, but I’m unable to maintain a chlorine reading. What’s wrong?

You most likely have what is called Combined Chlorine or Chloramines.  This occurs when free available chlorine residual combines with nitrogen-containing compounds such as urine, sweat, or other contaminants from swimmers or the environment.  This can be a frustrating and expensive problem to treat.  Our chemical lab can test your water and prescribe a treatment.  It usually involves adding large amounts of chlorine until you have reached a chlorine residual.  You have other options other than to continue to add large amounts of chlorine. We can walk you through the treatments.

My pool water is really cloudy. What could be causing this?

Cloudy water can be caused by many things.  First is filtration: If the filter is dirty or not running enough, it is ineffective in clearing the water.  Check the filter media and start with a clean filter first.  It is recommended that you run the filter 24 hours a day until the pool is clear.  Once the filter is clean, be sure the water is balanced properly.  High pH can cause cloudy water and also not let the chlorine work efficiently.  Also be sure there is nothing at the bottom of the pool that you can’t see.  (i.e.- Leaves and other debris)  Be sure to maintain a proper level of sanitizer in the pool.  If you are fighting to get the pool clear, there is a high demand in the water and it may use up your chlorine fast.  Treat for algae also.  This may be the start of an algae problem.  Also, if you have one, do not run the pool heater or use the solar cover until the water is clear.  As temperature increases, the sanitizer consumption increases as well.  You will make the process more difficult if you are increasing the temperature of the pool.

What is the difference between Granular and Liquid Shock?

The answer is most granular and sticks are stabilized chlorines and liquids are not.  Stabilized chlorine stays in the water longer and kills bacteria.  It is protected from breakdown from UV rays of the sun. Stabilized chlorine is most commonly found in granular, sticks, and tablets.  Unstabilized chlorine dissipates rapidly in sunlight.  The UV rays of the sun break down the unstabilized chlorine and make it unable to kill bacteria and keep water clear.

Do I need to test the water for more than Chlorine?

Yes. There are several other tests that should be done to keep your water in proper balance: most important being pH and Alkalinity.  These can cause problems to your pool and equipment if they are not balanced properly.  If your pH is too low, it can be very acidic and damage your pool and the equipment.  This is especially important for those of you who have pool heaters.  We can perform this test for you if you bring us a sample.

The water in the pool is not moving. What do I do?

Poor circulation can be caused by a number of things:

  1. Dirty Filter.  If the filter is dirty, the pressure on the filter is usually high.  The pump, which pulls the water from the pool, is not able to push the water into the filter because of the restriction of flow a dirty filter causes.  The cure to this, is to backwash or clean the filter.
  2. Air Leak in the Piping.  If there is air being pulled into the system on the suction side, the pump will not be able to keep it’s “prime” and will not be able to move the water.  Most air leaks are above ground and may even be from the pump basket lid not being secured properly.  Check all connections, threaded and glued, and see if any are loose.
  3. Dirty Skimmer or Pump Basket.  If the baskets are full, no water will be able to flow through them.  Inspect and clean the skimmer and pump basket(s) regularly.  If the baskets are clean, there could also be debris in the pumps impeller which will cause the flow of water again to be restricted. Some of these can be cleaned by reaching in behind the pump basket and pulling out debris that you can feel.  Be sure the pump is off and nobody will turn the switch on while you are working.

I have a sand filter. How often should I change the sand inside the filter?

We would usually recommend every five years.  However, the answer may also be decided by the condition of the water each season.  If you have treated some dirty or algae filled water, it may be necessary to change the sand more often.

I have a DE filter. How many scoops of DE powder do I add after I backwash?

Different sizes and types of filters require different amounts of filter media for proper filtration.  You should refer to the specification tag or sticker on the filter.

What is the best type of filter system?

The answer to this is usually what has worked best for you in the past.  The most common type is the Diatamaceous Earth  or “DE” filter.  This type of filter removes the smallest particles from the water.  Sand and Cartridge filters are 2 other types.  Each filter has benefits in certain applications.

What does it mean when someone says they have a salt water pool?

Salt water pools have long been popular in Europe and have become more popular in the United States recently.  It is a pool that has a certain parts per million(ppm) of salt(minerals) and is using that as a sanitizer.  Through the conversion of minerals to free available chlorine, or electrolysis, a sanitizer is produced.  Your pool water passes through a cell causing the production of chlorine gas and sodium hydroxide.  When added to water, chlorine gas forms hypochlorous acid which is a chlorinating sanitizer.  This is what keeps your pool clear and silky smooth all season long.  If you have ever been in a salt pool, you probably realized right away what it difference it makes on the feel of your skin.

Contact Us for More Information, and we can tell you about Mineral Springs, from Bio Guard.

I have some staining on the surfaces of my pool. What causes that to happen?

Surface stains are most commonly due to chemical imbalance. The 2 chemical stains are inorganic(metals like copper, iron, manganese) or organic(algae, pink slime). There are steps you can take to determine which type of stain it is.  Start with a white sock with Lo N Slo (ph Decreaser) over the stain for 1-3 minutes.  A Vitamin C tablet could also be used.  If the stain lightens, it is inorganic or metal.
If the stain does not lighten add some chlorine to a white sock and place it on the stain for 1-3 minutes.  A chlorine stick or tablet could also be used.  If the stain lightens, it is organic.  You can contact us for instructions on which chemical to use to treat your stain.

I’ve added large doses of shock, but I’m unable to maintain a chlorine reading. What’s wrong?

You most likely have what is called Combined Chlorine or Chloramines.  This occurs when free available chlorine residual combines with nitrogen-containing compounds such as urine, sweat, or other contaminants from swimmers or the environment.  This can be a frustrating and expensive problem to treat.  Our chemical lab can test your water and prescribe a treatment.  It usually involves adding large amounts of chlorine until you have reached a chlorine residual.  You have other options other than to continue to add large amounts of chlorine. We can walk you through the treatments.

My pool water is really cloudy. What could be causing this?

Cloudy water can be caused by many things.  First is filtration: If the filter is dirty or not running enough, it is ineffective in clearing the water.  Check the filter media and start with a clean filter first.  It is recommended that you run the filter 24 hours a day until the pool is clear.  Once the filter is clean, be sure the water is balanced properly.  High pH can cause cloudy water and also not let the chlorine work efficiently.  Also be sure there is nothing at the bottom of the pool that you can’t see.  (i.e.- Leaves and other debris)  Be sure to maintain a proper level of sanitizer in the pool.  If you are fighting to get the pool clear, there is a high demand in the water and it may use up your chlorine fast.  Treat for algae also.  This may be the start of an algae problem.  Also, if you have one, do not run the pool heater or use the solar cover until the water is clear.  As temperature increases, the sanitizer consumption increases as well.  You will make the process more difficult if you are increasing the temperature of the pool.

What is the difference between Granular and Liquid Shock?

The answer is most granular and sticks are stabilized chlorines and liquids are not.  Stabilized chlorine stays in the water longer and kills bacteria.  It is protected from breakdown from UV rays of the sun. Stabilized chlorine is most commonly found in granular, sticks, and tablets.  Unstabilized chlorine dissipates rapidly in sunlight.  The UV rays of the sun break down the unstabilized chlorine and make it unable to kill bacteria and keep water clear.

Do I need to test the water for more than Chlorine?

Yes. There are several other tests that should be done to keep your water in proper balance: most important being pH and Alkalinity.  These can cause problems to your pool and equipment if they are not balanced properly.  If your pH is too low, it can be very acidic and damage your pool and the equipment.  This is especially important for those of you who have pool heaters.  We can perform this test for you if you bring us a sample.

How often should I test the water?

It is good practice to test your pool water at least twice a week. The chemical balance can be greatly affected by mother nature in sun, wind and rain. It is also affected by the amount you use the pool.  Your own test kit or test strips is sufficient for this.  The most important thing to know is that even thought the pool water may look clear, the chemical balance could still need adjustment.  We recommend you bring the water to us once a month for a complete test.

Do you offer water testing?

Yes. If you bring us about a pint of your pool or spa water, we can test it in our lab and print out a customized treatment program for you.  We also need to know how many gallons of water are in the pool. You can tell us the size and we can estimate for you.  When taking a water sample, be sure to get it from at least elbow depth to get a more uniform sample.

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